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Divergences, Revue libertaire internationale en ligne
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N° 25. April 2011
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- Lybia and the Holy Triumvirate, William Blum
- Sri lanka.The simulated politics of diaspora, Nirmala Rajasingam
- The Trials of Pinar Selek, Cynthia Cockburn
- Israel. The Genie is out of the Bottle, Uri Avnery’s Column
- Trade unions in Israel stand in Solidarity with the Egyptian popular revolution, WAC
- Israel. In honor of the 100th International Woman’s Day, we march for fair employment and social justice
- A Statement for International Women’s Day, March 8, 2011, Asma Agbarieh-Zahalka
- Against the Crime of Sociocide, Larry Portis
- Tunisia.Hold Police Accountable for Shootings
- France.Tear-gassed in the Cévennes, Larry Portis
- Stéphane Hessel and the Re-kindling of Protest in France, Larry Portis
- Why the French Loathe Sarkozy. Political Disaffection in France, Larry Portis
- Barack "I’d kill for a peace prize" Obama, William Blum


- Incalculable. Drone warfare in Afghanistan, Kathy Kelly
- The responsibility of the mobile phone industry in the war of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Cécile Barbeito & Josep María Royo
- War Profiteering and Peace Movement Responses
- Wisconsin Labor Jams Capitol To Resist Governor’s Attacks, Howard Ryan
- Thousands in Wisconsin demonstrate against cuts, Tom Eley and Andre Damon
- The War in Madison, Christopher Fons
- The American Dream Conspiracy. Cultural Critique in Tennessee William’s "A Streetcar Named Desire", Arthur Miller’s "Death of a Salesman", and Edward Albee’s "Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?", Barry David Horwitz (1)
- The American Dream Conspiracy. Cultural Critique in Tennessee William’s "A Streetcar Named Desire", Arthur Miller’s "Death of a Salesman", and Edward Albee’s "Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?", Barry David Horwitz (2)

There is a problem with the idea and the reality of popular insurrections. If they are not motivated by a clear ideas about where the people are taking themselves and their institutions, wrong turns are almost inevitable. For this reason we must be careful not to allow euphoria to get the upper hand when reacting to the impressive accomplishments of the "Arab Spring," on the one hand, and the demonstrations and occupation in Madison, Wisconsin, on the other hand.

Yes, advances have been made, but reaction takes many forms, all of which can overturn temporary gains. From the assertion of military control in Egypt, to the repression in Yemen, Bahrain and elsewhere, to the dangers still present in Tunisia and, most clearly, to the prospect of either the reassertion of dictatorial control or of foreign occupation in Libya, political democracy is still threatened by imperialism everywhere throughout North Africa and the Eastern Mediterranean.

Neo-colonialism in such regions, and imperialistic culture and its reality-distorting grip on imaginations in the industrial-capitalist countries: here are the most tenacious obstacles to human progress. Will humanity have the time to create new, truly democratic institutions before some combination of circumstances threatens to set us back indefinitely, or even put an end to future prospects altogether? Impossible to say. What we do know is that only collective struggle holds out the hope of building a better world.




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